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PA IN THE MEDIA

Firms should start building quantum-ready data security ‘by end of 2022’

Min Bazys, a cyber security expert at PA Consulting, is quoted in an article about building quantum ready data security. 

The article explains that the power and potential of quantum computing offers huge opportunities for businesses of all industries and the clamour to invest in the technology is growing. However, not accounting for data privacy concerns could have serious consequences. 

Min explains that organisations cannot afford to neglect data privacy: “With quantum technologies rapidly maturing, responding to this must be a priority for privacy leaders. Organisations need to review their privacy strategy, build flexibility so they can respond to an evolving market, and educate people at all levels about quantum’s possibilities.” 

He goes on to say: “Quantum computers will be able to break current encryption standards, such as RSA, challenging the GDPR security principle. With encryption often essential to securing personal data, adopting quantum-resistant cryptography will be key to protecting people and complying with privacy regulations.” 

The article explains that PA recommends organisations have a quantum-secure privacy strategy in place by the end of 2022. Min says that firms will need to examine their existing technological infrastructure; identifying weak-points to strengthen, rather than waiting to respond to a data breach later. 

He goes on to say: “Meanwhile, not all the impacts of quantum technology are foreseeable today, so plans for new security measures will need to be flexible, in order to respond to future legislative changes. It currently takes an organisation an average of 200 days to detect a data breach, but with quantum sensing technology, there will be more efficient early warning systems.” 

The article goes on to discuss educating people at all levels and that even with the right planning and technology in place, it is education that is the most important part of privacy resilience. People facing those new challenges need to be prepared to evolve with the situation. 

Min says: “For example, quantum technologies are set to enhance the optimisation of targeted advertising through more complex data analysis and behaviour simulations. This raises significant privacy challenges, such as ensuring you have the appropriate legal basis to use the technology in such a way.” 

With quantum technology quickly maturing, starting to change an organisation’s thinking around data privacy is crucial. By acting today to review privacy strategy with quantum technology in mind, firms can position their organisation to protect customers’ privacy in the quantum age.

Read the full article on Tech Register

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