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How can we stop healthcare from bankrupting our children?

Self-care worldGuru worldSimplicity worldEcosystem world

How can we pay for better and more accessible healthcare in future while maintaining spending in the rest of the economy?

Register your details to download a copy of our Future Healthcare Worlds report

We are seeing a revolution in healthcare. Reform is putting the patient at the centre of care. It is shifting the emphasis from treating isolated conditions towards managing the interconnected factors that influence a person’s wellbeing over time. But these advances in healthcare do not come cheap. The cost of care is increasing at an alarming rate.

We see four potential directions that healthcare can take – each of which will create a distinct 'world' where the bill is picked up in a different way. Each future healthcare world has different implications for the patient, the provider and the payer.

All organisations involved in developing, delivering, managing and funding healthcare need to think about where they want to be as powerful trends reshape their world. More importantly, they need to consider how they can influence the type of healthcare world that emerges.

Select one of the four future healthcare worlds on the left to see what it might mean for your organisation

To read about our four future healthcare worlds in more detail, request a copy of our Future Healthcare Worlds report

Self-care worldGuru worldSimplicity worldEcosystem worldHome

Self-Care World

Four worlds self care

In Self-Care World, patients pay for their own healthcare, often straight from their pockets rather than through private health insurance. 

William, a successful stockbroker, looks after his own health issues by arranging for intervention to fix specific problems. He keeps his own medical records and relies on freelance doctors and boutique healthcare provision. Like everyone in this world, the quality of healthcare received depends on how much William can afford to pay.

Given William’s significant annual earnings, the price of convenience is a measly sum in return for the luxury of the instant quality healthcare he receives. The boutique healthcare practice he pays takes on no more than 400 patients so there is no fighting for physician time or being shoved out the door in a hurry.

But the real beauty is that tracking his healthcare is as seamless as checking his emails. Each morning, he wakes up and accesses his personal health record. Here, he can view information on everything from his sleep patterns to his vital health indicators and the quality of his diet, all intelligently captured through the devices that surround him. This technology can even confirm whether or not he has taken his daily dose of diabetes medication. This helps William and his doctors monitor adherence and gives them early warning of potential problems. 

Recently, when he had sharp chest pains in the middle of the night, William speed-dialed his physician. The doctor was there in minutes to offer support, access his records and provide a trusted professional opinion.

Guru World

Four worlds guru

In Guru World, there is no single payer: a wide range of insurers choose which organisations they will buy healthcare from, on behalf of their policyholders.

Zee is feeling pretty good right now. Last year she was told by her cardiologist that she would need a heart valve operation. When she found out that her health insurance wouldn’t cover the cost of the operation if performed by a leading local specialist, she researched her options. She found an equally well-reputed surgeon overseas, who was able to do the operation for a fraction of the cost.

As Zee also has diabetes, she goes direct to a leading endocrinologist who she feels has given her outstanding care. She has just been offered a new artificial pancreas device and with that she finds it much easier to manage her care and maintain her busy working life.

As Zee takes a ride in a taxi, however, it occurs to her that life doesn’t seem quite so rosy for the driver. He mentions that his mother has diabetes but was finding it hard to keep up with her regimen. Now it appears she may need to have her foot amputated and will need more help from her family carers. The taxi driver says he doesn’t know how the family will cope.

Simplicity World

Four worlds simplicity

In Simplicity World, patients are not required to take responsibility for their health or for organising healthcare. Standard care is available, either through state-funded ‘universal care’ or through integrated healthcare policies available from insurers.

The universal health coverage was one of the main reasons why Yvonne decided to emigrate. Her home country didn’t have integrated healthcare. It’s just as well, because she leads a busy life and doesn’t have time to figure out all the different options – it’s all part of the statutory plan she has to take out.

Last year, Yvonne needed some physiotherapy following a sports injury. She called the insurer for an initial screening consultation and was given entitlement to treatment. The insurer then helped her choose where she would be treated and book the sessions based on where she was going to be for the next few weeks.

This experience is a significant improvement on what happened before Yvonne moved. Then, when Yvonne needed some rehab after a separate sports injury, she phoned up the health plan provider and was told she was not entitled to physiotherapy because she was suffering from a pre-existing condition. This meant she had to take time off work at an extremely inconvenient time.

Ecosystem World

Four worlds ecosystem

In Ecosystem World, technology and information drive the delivery of healthcare. Patients themselves are
responsible for monitoring their own health data.

John was conducting his six-monthly review of his family’s wellness. He called up the data on his watch, looking at the overall scores in physical, social and cognitive wellbeing. It was two months since the whole family had their genome analysis completed. During the last analysis, the app had suggested that John had a higher than normal risk of dementia and that Sarah, his wife, was at risk of breast cancer in her fifties.

He wanted to refresh his health analysis now that he had significantly decreased his weekly alcohol consumption. Happily, he noticed that his overall risk of dementia had reduced. This was partly due to his behaviour change, but it also reflected that the data sample set was growing, giving a more accurate picture.

Sarah had initially been resistant to wearing the special sensing fabrics that monitor changes in heat distribution, indicating possible change in her tissues. However, she felt reassured once she got used to it. Now she had started to communicate with fellow wearers.

John's son Jake was getting a lot fitter now, tracking his personal bests and unlocking Xbox time credits in the process. He was so motivated by getting his virtual team to the top of the FIFA30 league that he hadn’t noticed that he was becoming extremely fit in the real world. 

John checked the monthly payments on his wellness account and was pleased to see that they had reduced as the family’s overall health had improved.

Developing healthcare of the future [download]

Request our Future Healthcare Worlds report

Request our Future Healthcare Worlds report [download]

How can we pay for better and more accessible healthcare while maintaining spending in the rest of the economy?

We are seeing a revolution in healthcare. Reform is putting the patient at the centre of care. It is shifting the emphasis from treating isolated conditions towards managing the interconnected factors that influence a person’s wellbeing over time. But these advances in healthcare do not come cheap. The cost of care is increasing at an alarming rate.

We see four potential directions that healthcare can take – each of which will create a distinct 'world' where the bill is picked up in a different way. Each world has different implications for the patient, the provider and the payer.

All organisations involved in developing, delivering, managing and funding healthcare need to think about where they want to be as powerful trends reshape their world. More importantly, they need to consider how they can influence the type of world that emerges.

PAnorama Healthcare Worlds TG
http://www.paconsulting.com/our-thinking/future-healthcare-worlds/fw/

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